tbhobbs

A Terrible Continuity: The Lynching of Ahmaud Arbery

Last week the Pulitzer Prize committee issued a posthumous her citation to renown journalist and antilynching activist, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, 89 years after her death. Over the course of her life, Wells-Barnett was unrelenting in her mission to tell the truth about lynching in America during a deadly era in which whites, sometimes in small groups, sometimes in large groups, committed often brutal and torturous extralegal murders of Black people, most frequently Black men. Over the course of a nearly a century, between the 1870s and the 1950s, more than 4,000 lynchings were recorded in the United States. In their defense, white men routinely claimed that these spectacles of public murder were necessary to keep Black men—dangerous, criminal, and rapacious—in line and, most importantly, to protect vulnerable white women.

Remembering the Tuskegee Airmen

The following is adapted from “Soaring: The Legacy of the Tuskegee Airmen in South Florida,” an exhibition I curated for the Miramar Cultural Trust, that was on display at the Miramar Cultural Center and is currently on display at the Ft. Lauderdale Branch of the Broward County Library through the end of February. In 1939, …

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The Tribulations of a Race Dialogue

It was a book discussion. As a part of my work with the South Florida People of Color (SFPoC), I signed on to facilitate a book discussion of Carol Anderson’s White Rage: The Untold Truth of Our Racial Divide. We had been approached by the Take Down Slavery Symbols in Hollywood group, a part of …

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Celebrating Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa is a holiday that most in the African American community know about, but aren’t very well-versed on. It’s an important holiday to me because it represents everything I stand for as an African American woman. A celebration of community, family and friends that brings us closer to our roots. What Is Kwanzaa? A week …

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HBCU Digest: “HBCUs – The Institutional Antidote to White Fragility” by Tameka Bradley Hobbs, Ph.D.

This is my latest for HBCU Digest. When I saw Alicia’s post for the first time, I was blown away by the way that she voiced so many of the complexities that come along with being black and educated in our society. I knew I had to unpack it. I’m really grateful to the Ahalt …

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Life and Death in the Tongue: The Power of Talking (or Not Talking) About Race

By Tameka Bradley Hobbs, Ph.D. “Death and life are in the power of the tongue: and they that love it shall eat the fruit thereof.” – Proverbs 18:21 For the past year, I’ve worked with a passionate group of citizens in the community of Miami Shores to engage in conversations about race and history. Recognizing …

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